Category Archives: Compliance

Auditor QuickQuiz Update

Our short auditor skills QuickQuiz has only been live for a few days and we have logged responses.  The number of respondents is smaller than anticipated but trends are appearing.

The Good:  Respondents understand follow through with sampling plans, are aware of the Fraud Triangle and know the role body language plays in interviews.

The Bad:  Most importantly, respondents have been unable to identify specific threats to auditor independence and they have demonstrated a lower-than-expected understanding evidence corroboration and hierarchy.  Other areas where knowledge improvements seem necessary are materiality determinations, awareness of basic audit terminology and the scope of a QA/QC review.

Keep those responses coming in, and thank you for taking a few minutes to complete it.

RY2016 Conflict Minerals Disclosure Analysis Now Available From Development International

Dr. Chris Bayer, PhD of Development International has released the latest comprehensive analysis of the SEC conflict minerals disclosures for the 2016 reporting year.  Elm Sustainability Partners is pleased to be one of the report’s sponsors this year.

The report is available to download for free.

 

Is 2017 the Time to Think About 2021?

This may sound like a US presidential election campaign, but thankfully it’s not. The EU conflict minerals directive is now final and reporting is required beginning January 1, 2021 – three and a half years from now. If you aren’t familiar with the upcoming EU conflict minerals due diligence and reporting obligations, take a moment to read what we think is a good, plain-language overview.

We have had many conversations about what the EU Directive means for companies right now. Below is a table of the more common discussion points that may be helpful to those grappling with whether to begin program development and implementation now or wait until the deadline is closer.

Pros

Cons

Third party service provider costs are low at this time due to maturity of conflict minerals reporting in US Program implementation costs and effort not yet necessary
Limited incremental costs for EU companies already reporting conflict minerals information to US customers or the SEC Program implementation costs and effort not yet necessary; regulatory uncertainty exists until member states adopt their own supporting mandates.
Flexibility in reporting Reporting format unknown at this time; regulatory uncertainty exists until member states adopt their own supporting mandates.
Potential competitive advantage may be gained with customers and corporate reputation Market awareness may be low currently, so investment now may not show a return
Acquire experience and correct program errors and gaps in advance of legal deadline, reduce risk of fines, penalties, customer pressure and reputational damage Further options and third party information sources likely to develop and improve over time, leading to better reporting at legal deadline

 

Feel free to contact us with any questions.

New Advanced Auditor Training Program for HSE/CSR Auditors

Elm Sustainability Partners and Elm Consulting Group International have launched a new training module for senior-level and experienced health, safety, environmental and social auditors seeking to improve their auditing skills and get updates on timely topics related to non-financial auditing and technology.

It is also relevant to those buying HSE/CSR audit services who are looking to improve the quality of audits they receive.  After this course, buyers can identify specific areas of audit practice improvements to request of their providers.  Alternatively, these buyers may wish to require their external HSE/CSR auditor to complete this training themselves.

A partial list of what is covered includes detailed review and practicum concerning:

  • auditor independence standards and managing impairment threats
  • audit criteria requirements
  • audit and evidence limitations
  • evidence hierarchy, weighting and corroboration
  • fraud, forgery and tampering – including new concerns brought about by technology
  • interviewing skills including fraud examination and FBI techniques
  • discussions of US Department of Justice Criminal Division Evaluation of Compliance Program criteria (2017), the June 1, 2017 US Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (“PCAOB”) auditor reporting standard on Critical Audit Matters and EU Non-financial reporting rule
  • audit QA/QC considerations

Each participant will take a pre-test to establish a knowledge baseline and identify specific areas for improvements.  Exercises are administered throughout and a post-test will conclude the session demonstrating the advanced competencies gained.  HSE/CSR regulatory and other technical topics will not be covered as this is not a regulatory update session.

Elm Principals are BEAC Certified Professional Environmental/Health/Safety Auditors (CPEA), have served on the Board of Directors of The Auditing Roundtable (recently merged into the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA)) and BEAC, and have trained thousands of internal and external HSE auditors over the past three decades.

Contact us to learn how you and your team can take advantage of this unique program.

New Social Auditor Certification in the Works

We have been vocal in our concerns and criticisms concerning social/CSR auditing.  And we have ourselves been criticized for that. Fair enough.

The Association for Professional Social Compliance Auditors (APSCA) has released for public comment its draft Code of Conduct and Auditor Competency Standards – available here.

We support APSCA and its work towards improving the entire “ecosystem” of CSR auditing.  Anyone with a dog in this hunt should click on the link above and submit comments.  APSCA is keen to obtain input from as wide a range of stakeholders as possible to help become as credible as possible.  Given the breath of subject matter that is being demanded of CSR auditors by buyers of their services, there is a great deal of overlap in APSCA’s draft into environmental health, safety, transportation and other technical areas.

No Indication of Conflict Minerals Cutbacks in SEC FY2018 Budget

SEC Chairman Jay Clayton presented the FY2018 budget for the Securities and Exchange Commission to Congress today.  The conflict minerals disclosure was not specifically mentioned but the budget did contain some interesting details:

  • More than half of the Commission’s total headcount is assigned to enforcement activities of various types.
  • The SEC has not launched any new research initiatives to gather feedback from investors on the usefulness of disclosures since FY2012.  Apparently, the actions of Michael Piwowar concerning the conflict minerals disclosure were not based on formal research from the SEC itself about investor views.
  • The number of filings reviewed by the Division of Corporation Finance for CY2017 was 4900, and is expected to remain the same for CY2018.  Sarbanes-Oxley requires the SEC to review company filings at least every three years, so perhaps there is some level of review by the SEC of conflict minerals disclosures, even if no enforcement actions have (or apparently will) resulted.

 

Conflict Minerals is Dead! Long Live Conflict Minerals!

The deadline for filing the CY2016 SEC conflict minerals disclosure has now passed, although there are likely to be a few late filers. It is too early to glean anything from the filings and at least three analyses will be conducted, including the Development International study, which is the most comprehensive of them. We all anxiously await these reports.

The future of the SEC disclosure requirement is murky and there is a chance that this may be the last year of mandated filing in the US. Many clients and others are asking us questions about the future of conflict minerals, and what the past results have been. These are our thoughts.

Looking forward, we do not know what is in store for the SEC rule. There are many moving parts politically and publically. We will know what happens when it happens. I’d like to think there will be adequate advance notice to those impacted, but even that is not assured.

But the review mirror tells a story too. While aspects of the rule’s impact are hotly debated, one thing is indisputable – it resulted in much greater visibility into material sourcing and other companies deep in supply chains. This has allowed some companies to reduce business risk by optimizing their supply chains – concentrating spending power or diversifying their supply base to manage potential disruptions. Companies identified that, unbeknownst to them, entities sanctioned by the US Department of Treasury Office of Foreign Asset Control (OFAC) may have been present in their supply chains. Supplier audits/screening improved in many cases.  Appropriate auditor qualifications in light of global reliance on audit results has also become a major question in the scheme of things.

Of course, the rule brought human rights abuses in the DRC and other countries out of the shadows and into the light of the public. But has the population of the DRC benefitted? Experts continue to argue both sides of the question. Without taking sides, earlier this year we attempted to evaluate one major criticism of the SEC rule – that it directly resulted in hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of jobs lost in the 3TG mining sector. The question we posed ourselves was what impact did the 2008 – 2010 global economic recession have on artisanal and small miner (ASM) job losses which are currently attributed only to Dodd-Frank Section 1502? Did the timing of 1502 coincidentally occur at a time when mining jobs were already in decline because of pre-existing macroeconomic conditions?

Our intent was to rely on existing literature rather than creating original research as this was an unfunded effort on our own part. After a few months, we ran into two insurmountable obstacles:

  • The existing DRC-specific literature we found does not acknowledge or give any consideration to potential impacts of the 2008 – 2010 global economic recession. Yet analyses from The World Bank, the World Economic Forum (WEF) and the International Finance Corporation (IFC) demonstrate that global economic downturns play a major role in commodity prices and mining jobs worldwide, including ASM.
  • The DRC has a uniquely major informal economy which some literature indicated accounts for up to 80% of the country’s total economic activity annually. There is a significant gap in available information on DRC’s informal economy and what is available was sometimes inconsistent with other data on the same matter or irrelevant to our study.

We found only two sources referencing global 3TG price influence on prices paid to DRC ASMs.  Other data supported the position that a very large number of ASM miners in DRC move between multiple jobs based on income potential, so when ore prices were low in the past, miners moved to agriculture or other income sources. There was a meaningful amount of anecdotal information supporting the hypothesis that several factors other than Section 1502 (such as the DRC’s own taxation and mining policies) had a direct effect on DRC ASM job losses within the timeframe of interest, but we were not willing to rely on non-empirical information. We put down our pen (or mouse) and moved on to other things.

So the debate will continue.

There have been developments beyond just the SEC rule. The European Union adopted their own version of a conflict minerals due diligence rule that impacts a different class of companies and goes into effect in 2021. And the application of the OECD Due Diligence Framework is expanding into other materials (such as cobalt) and other geographies. At the moment, that appears to be just the beginning of that trend and that future is unknown as well.

In the end, what can be said about Section 1502 in consideration of it’s possible end? It all depends on your perspective, but it ain’t over till it’s over.  And it ain’t over.

The No-Fluff Latest “Must Read” on Conflict Minerals Filings for 2016

The conflict minerals disclosure is still required for calendar year 2016. No Executive Order has been issued, nor has SEC eliminated or modified the rule. Acting Chairman Michael Piwowar did direct the Staff to “to reconsider whether the 2014 guidance on the conflict minerals rule is still appropriate and whether any additional relief is appropriate” but no action has been taken as yet.  Any action that may be taken would most likely follow standard rule making procedures (proposal publication, public comment, Commission adoption of final rule).  Given the timing typically required for the entire process, it is highly unlikely that a rule change will occur before the end of calendar year 2017.

The use of specific product determination wording it still voluntary. The 2014 SEC Guidance remains in effect.

An IPSA is required only when a company voluntarily chooses to use the product determination wording of “DRC Conflict Free” or “Not DRC Conflict Free”. The 2014 SEC Guidance remains in effect.  We expect the number of IPSAs to rise slightly for the 2016 filing.

Companies continue to confuse the smelter/refiner location country with the country of origin.  Quite simply, the country of origin is where the rocks come out of the ground; the smelter/refiner location country is  where those rocks are processed.  These are  frequently different countries.

Companies also continue to report countries of origin that are not plausible sources of production or reserves (e.g., Hong Kong and UAE).  A plausibility review of all countries should be conducted before submitting the Conflict Minerals Report (CMR) to the SEC.  We have developed a comprehensive list of plausible countries of origin from a range of sources including USGS, Department of State and experts in each of the metals trade.  This is used as part of our smelter/refiner verification services.  Contact us if you would like more information.

Six high-risk smelters/refiners are frequently identified by suppliers.    Three of these are related to US-sanctioned entities (Fidelity Printers, Sudan Gold Refinery and Central Bank of DPRK), not conflict minerals.  Issuers need to determine how they will address these within their conflict minerals disclosure, if at all.

The EU conflict minerals regulation has been finalized and differs from the US regulation in that it applies to companies with more than 500 employees, importers of 3TG, contains applicability thresholds and goes into effect in 2021.

Just over 12,000 comments were submitted to the SEC in response to Acting Chairman Piwowar’s request for comments. More than 11,700 of those comments were form letters and just over half of the remaining 300 were submitted by concerned citizens. Approximately 130 comments were submitted by company representatives, industry groups, Congolese society, NGOs and investors. In our view, opinion reflected in the 130 was split relatively evenly for and against the rule. We noted that several of the comments against the rule cited erroneous and outdated information, specifically concerning costs of rule implementation.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Subcommittee on Africa and Global Health Policy is holding a public hearing on April 5 titled A Progress Report on Conflict Minerals.  Yes we will be there.

The US State Department announced they are “seeking input from stakeholders to inform recommendations of how best to support responsible sourcing of tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold.”

Some DC pundits believe that, in the aftermath of the Trump administration and Republican Party failure to succeed on healthcare, Democrats are emboldened to resist efforts to revamp Dodd-Frank. Perhaps, similar to what Mark Twain once wrote, “reports of its death are greatly exaggerated”.

New Comments to SEC Show Ongoing Misunderstanding, Excess Spending for Conflict Minerals Rule

The new public comment period initiated by SEC Acting Chairman Michael Piwowar is now closed and we have reviewed almost all the submittals.  What is surprising is that there still seems to be significant misunderstanding or interpretations of the rule, and some issuers are spending far more than is likely necessary.  The following comments and estimates that caught our attention:

  • Two industry groups cite a company spending $10 million in initial implementation costs and $3 million in ongoing costs (most likely the same company).  We were shocked to see those numbers.  No client of ours, nor any of the many Fortune 500 we have direct or indirect contact with, has expended that much in relation to the Rule.  
  • One company is cited as needing 7 months to survey 300 suppliers.  If that is indeed current information, there are most likely program implementation approaches available that the company is unaware of, or has chosen not to pursue.
  • Another commenter privately disclosed their cost and associated scope of their efforts to us in an email dialogue.  Based on our understanding, that company is expending approximately 90% more effort than needed.  They have received poor guidance on the rule or made a voluntary decision to go down that path.
  • There are multiple references to an estimate of an IPSA costing $250,000 – $350,000 and taking six months.  This estimate appears to reflect the original proposed rule rather than the IPSA objectives and scope of the final rule and the subsequent guidance.  During the proposed rule phase, little guidance was available on the IPSA and the auditing community anticipated full supply chain audits, or audits that confirmed product determinations. The final rule made it abundantly clear that the actual IPSA objectives/scope are far narrower.  

If you think you are spending more than is necessary for your conflict minerals program, give us a call.  We can probably find ways to reduce your effort and costs.

BREAKING: Leaked Draft Executive Order Suspending Conflict Minerals Law

Yesterday, several news outlets reported on what was claimed to be a leaked draft Executive Order that would, if signed by President Trump, suspend Dodd-Frank Section 1502 for a two year period by claiming it is in the US national security interest to eliminate US corporate due diligence activities concerning tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold (3TG).  The document offers no explanation as to  the reasoning behind the conclusion that national security interests are either currently threatened or how national security would improve by the action.  Further, the Executive Order cites incorrect and outdated information about the costs of the Rule.  In the end, none of that may matter as President Trump will almost certainly sign such an Order regardless.

Would that mean all conflict minerals traceability and reporting processes would immediately come to a halt?

No.

First, there will continue to be customer demands for the information regardless of the SEC disclosure requirement, and you will have to meet your customer information requests or possibly jeopardize the business relationship. Second, the Order will very likely be challenged in court as was the President’s recent travel “ban” Executive Order.  Once it goes to court, who knows what will happen and how fast or slow.

We recommend continuing to move forward on the due diligence and reporting activities already underway for calendar year 2016.  But stay tuned – the situation is changing more rapidly and drastically than anyone had imagined.